Kingston All Stars

Kingston All Stars

In 2016 Clarks Originals captured the moment when the Kingston All Stars, a supergroup of musicians who feature on some of the most influential reggae albums of all time, united in the studio to record brand new music. Kingston All Stars is a celebration of the music of Jamaica and Clarks inextricable link with the island’s musicians and music lovers.

1971. Jamaican reggae singer, Dennis Alcapone, bestrides the cover of his album ‘Guns Don’t Argue’ wearing a pair of Clarks Wallabees. It’s a defining moment in a remarkable story that continues to unfold to this day; a story that links Clarks Originals with Jamaica, and its musicians and music lovers, and a story celebrated in

Clarks Originals Presents Kingston All Stars.

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Filmed in 2016, the film catches up with many of the musicians who featured on some of the most influential reggae albums of all time. It looks back at the birth of reggae, the unmistakable sound, the offbeat rhythms and staccato chords. It looks forward to 2017 and new music by the Kingston All Stars – a supergroup of reggae legends.  And it pays tribute to the work of Jamaica’s Alpha Boys School, where education and musical tuition have been helping to transform young lives for more than 100 years. Featuring some of the most gifted players and singers to ever walk the streets of the Jamaican capital, the Kingston All Stars recall the heyday of vintage reggae. The stellar line-up includes Sly Dunbar, Ansell Collins, Mikey ‘Mao’ Chung, Linford ‘Hux’ Brown, Jackie Jackson, Robbie Lynn, Everton and Everald Gayle. Between them, recording and performing alongside greats like Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, Toots and the Maytals and The Upsetters they created the classic reggae sounds of the 1960s and 70s; sounds that would live on to influence everything from hip hop and dancehall to dubstep and techno.

The Alpha Boys School, was founded in 1880 and their mission is ‘ … the empowerment and personal transformation of young people through education and skills training’. The school has had its own band since 1892 and in recent years, its pupils, former pupils and teachers have been credited with influencing the development of ska and reggae.

What Dennis Alcapone started in 1971, other reggae artists including Dillinger, OJ Trinity and Little John continued, turning Clarks Originals like the Wallabee,  the Desert Boot, and Desert Trek into an essential part of Jamaican culture.